2030 Agenda

On 25th September 2015, countries adopted a set of goals to end poverty, protect the planet, foster peaceful, just and inclusive societies, and ensure prosperity for all through a revitalised Global Partnership for Sustainable Development, as part of a new sustainable development agenda, known as the 2030 Agenda. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets that form this agenda build on the Millennium Development Goals, and aim to complete what these did not achieve. Each goal has specific targets to be achieved over the next 15 years, but the goals are interconnected – often the key to success on one will involve tackling issues more commonly associated with another. The agenda seeks to realize the human rights of all and to achieve gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls, and the goals balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: economic, social and environmental.

Related Publications

  • Secretary-General Guterres speaking at the high-level dialogue

    On September 10, 2019, the President of the United Nations General Assembly, along with the Presidents of the Economic and Social Council and the Security Council and the Secretary-General of the United Nations, convened for the second in a series of high-level dialogues to discuss the challenges facing multilateralism and the role of the United Nations in preserving it. The dialogue on “Reaffirming the Commitment to Multilateralism through the Strengthening of the International System and Institutions" was co-organized by the Permanent Missions of Ecuador, Norway, and the Russian Federation, in association with the NYU Center on International Cooperation (CIC).

    Sep 23, 2019
    Multilateral Reform
  • Timorese and international judges preside over the Tribunal de Recurso in Dili, Timor-Leste.

    © United Nations Photo

    In the sixth briefing in CIC's series on prevention, we take stock after the July 2019 High-level Political Forum on the instrumental role that development initiatives can play in conflict prevention. As highlighted in the 2011 World Development Report and the 2018 UN–World Bank Pathways for Peace report, often root causes are related to lack of equitable access to economic opportunities, or a combination of political and economic inequalities that fuel grievances. Some risk factors may therefore need to be addressed with development tools. Drawing on field research and on member state reporting at the recent High-level Political Forum, this briefing highlights development measures countries have taken to support prevention, and highlights ways the UN system can better assist these efforts.

    Aug 31, 2019
    Paige Arthur, Céline Monnier
  • Original image: www.ecowas.int

    In discussions on the prevention agenda at the United Nations, member states express concerns about potential infringement on their sovereignty. This briefing, our fourth in our series on prevention at the United Nations, looks at the way ECOWAS has addressed similar sensitivities with its member states to become a symbol of successful conflict prevention.

    Aug 29, 2019
    Paige Arthur, Céline Monnier
    2030 Agenda, Crises
    Peace and Security

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