With each new year of data, and each new intergovernmental report, it becomes harder to deny the scale and urgency of the energy transition required to prevent catastrophic anthropogenic climate change. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change urges countries to take action to prevent a rise in temperature by more than 1.5°C, and warns of catastrophic consequences of a rise above 2°C. Yet current policies and pledges fall far short of hitting these targets.

The Financial Mail cited the Congo Research Group's "I Need You, I Don’t Need You: South Africa and Inga III" report in this article on the hydroelectric project.

"Delays to the ambitious Inga 3 hydropower project in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) could be aggravated by the Covid-19 pandemic, but SA has vowed to honour its commitment to the project—for the sake of the continent," the article notes.

Apr 23, 2020
South Africa

This paper analyzes COVID-19 relief spending in ten countries to assess whether governments are investing resources in inclusive programs that will lead to the desired goal of ‘building back better.’ The results of this analysis indicate that current investments are likely to maintain the status quo, and potentially lead to a deepening of inequalities by overlooking urgent needs of marginalized groups affected by the social and economic effects of the pandemic. The countries analyzed are the following: Canada, Costa Rica, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Mexico, Sierra Leone, South Korea, Sweden, Tunisia, and Uruguay.

Jul 07, 2021
Amanda Lenhardt

This essay explores the themes of United Nations (UN) peacekeeping offensive operations and Unexploded Ordinance (UXOs), Explosive Remnants of War (ERW) and Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs). As the character of conflict changes, there is an increased international focus on IEDs. The traditional threat of ERW has been further complicated by the preponderance of IEDs in war-affected countries.

Aug 09, 2017
South Africa
United Nations

Peacebuilding continues to gain recognition in international and national spheres for the crucial role it plays in laying the foundations for sustainable peace. In the last two decades, the United Nations has developed its peacebuilding architecture (PBA) in order to strengthen its responses to countries recovering from conflict. Within this larger context, 2015 will be a critical year for peacebuilding as member states undertake a comprehensive review of the UN PBA.

Dec 10, 2014
Center on International Cooperation

In November, CIC joined with the Institute of Security Studies to host a discussion with member state representatives and UN staff on African perspectives on the future of peacebuilding. Peacebuilding continues to gain recognition in international and national spheres for the crucial role it plays in laying the foundations for sustainable peace. In the last two decades, the United Nations has developed its peacebuilding architecture (PBA) in order to strengthen its responses to countries recovering from conflict.

There are reasons to think that Africa may be a place where prospects of Sino-European cooperation are promising. EU members – and above all France – continue to play an active role in crisis management in weak African states like Mali, Somalia, and the Central African Republic. 

Read the Full ECFR article African Security – a bright spot for Sino-European cooperation

Nov 04, 2014
Richard Gowan
United Nations

After a marathon negotiation session, the Open Working Group (OWG) on the Sustainable Development Goals finalized its outcome document.

Member states are increasingly looking to 2015 as a milestone for progress on United Nations Security Council reform. 2015 marks the seventieth anniversary of the UN, fifty years since the implementation of the last (and only) Council enlargement, and ten years since the 2005 World Summit. This paper provides an overview of the current context, an explanation of global perspectives on UNSC reform, and analysis of discussions on UNSC reform in and around the African Union.

May 15, 2014
Richard Gowan, Nora Gordon
United Nations
Africa,United Nations, Security Council Reform,Nora Gordon

© Nora Gordon

After nearly a decade Africa has decided to revisit its common position on United Nations Security Council (UNSC) reform at a summit in Brazzaville, Congo this week. In 2005, Africa established a united position on UN reform in the Ezulwini Consensus.

May 15, 2014
Nora Gordon
United Nations

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