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The flags of the 193 UN Member States fly at the Palais des Nations, seat of the UN Office at Geneva

© United Nations Photo

Member states agree—in principle—with the Secretary-General that the United Nations should do more to­­­ prevent crises before they emerge, including through assisting countries to tackle root causes. But translating this approach into practice sometimes raises sensitivities and questions.

This briefing, our third in a series on prevention at the UN, maps out a wide range of member states’ concerns around the approach to prevention at the UN, based on dialogues with a regionally diverse group of 20 member states. It also identifies key areas of common ground that can provide the basis for forward movement on practical implementation of the prevention agenda.

Jul 02, 2019
Paige Arthur, Céline Monnier
Peace and Security

Beneficial owners are defined as those who are the natural persons who ultimately own/control a customer and/or the natural persons on whose behalf a transaction is being conducted. It also includes those persons who exercise ultimate control over a legal person or arrangement. The availability of this information is a key requirement of international tax transparency and the fight against financial crime. Beneficial ownership is now the leading issue in the global anti-corruption and tax justice movement. 

This policy paper is the fourth contribution to the challenge paper on the Grand Challenge on Inequality and Exclusion, which will be launched in July 2019 at the UN High-level Political Forum.

Jul 01, 2019
Children Playing in Front of Mural in Timor Leste

© United Nations Photo

The United Nations acknowledges that prevention is first and foremost a national priority. Indeed, governments routinely undertake efforts to reduce the risks of violent conflict, even when such actions are not formally called “prevention.”

This briefing, our second in a series on prevention at the UN, describes nationally led approaches to building resilience and reducing risk based on field research in Timor-Leste and Tunisia, as well as examples from a number of other countries, including the Gambia and Norway. 

Jun 25, 2019
Paige Arthur, Céline Monnier
Peace and Security
Schoolchildren in a classroom at the Mazouzi Mohamed Primary School in Algiers during Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s visit to the school.

© United Nations Photo

Inclusive societies require progressive taxation and public spending policies to unlock the untapped potential of communities on the sidelines of economic progress. There is a common misconception that technical barriers are the key challenges to achieving this, however, this paper argues that the barriers to progressive taxation and public spending are largely political in nature. 

This policy paper is the third contribution to the challenge paper on the Grand Challenge on Inequality and Exclusion, which will be launched in July 2019 at the UN High-level Political Forum.  

Jun 25, 2019
Paul Von Chamier
A woman holds a cloth sign on her back that reads “Power to the Peaceful” at a March For Our Lives rally in Portland, Maine.

All over the world, countries at widely varying levels of development and with very different histories are grappling with a similar challenge: breakdown of common ground in politics. This policy paper, the second contribution to the challenge paper on the Grand Challenge on Inequality and Exclusion which will be launched in July 2019 at the UN High-level Political Forum, argues that the solution is to find ways back to a shared sense of common ground, common identity, and common purpose by "untriggering" politics, addressing grievances, and rebuilding common ground.

Jun 18, 2019
Alex Evans

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