No more great power speed dating

Last week, three significant though unrelated events unfolded that are likely to influence the evolving global order and India's role in it. The first was the dramatic and disastrous referendum, which will lead to Britain's exit (Brexit) from the European Union (EU). The second was India's quiet entry into the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) - one of four clubs of the non-proliferation regime New Delhi is determined to join. Finally, there was the valiant, though ultimately unsuccessful, Indian effort to become a member of the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG); although, with the appointment of a facilitator to the chair, the door remains ajar. All three provide opportunities and challenges for New Delhi to shape the rules of the emerging world order, particularly on issues of vital interest to India, including climate, cyber, energy and trade.

At the global level, Brexit is likely to see Britain, one of the key actors in decision-making become increasingly distracted with its internal divisions. This provides an opportunity for India to contribute to the liberal democratic order's leadership.

India's NSG bid in Seoul should be seen primarily as an effort to bridge the gap between the existing nuclear disorder and the changing world order. New Delhi believes it cannot play a greater role in the emerging world order without a change in the nuclear order. Beijing's fervent and vocal anti-India stance in Seoul is only the latest in a series of efforts to keep India out of the various global decision-making processes.

Last week, three significant though unrelated events unfolded that are likely to influence the evolving global order and India's role in it. The first was the dramatic and disastrous referendum, which will lead to Britain's exit (Brexit) from the European Union (EU). The second was India's quiet entry into the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) - one of four clubs of the non-proliferation regime New Delhi is determined to join. Finally, there was the valiant, though ultimately unsuccessful, Indian effort to become a member of the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG); although, with the appointment of a facilitator to the chair, the door remains ajar. All three provide opportunities and challenges for New Delhi to shape the rules of the emerging world order, particularly on issues of vital interest to India, including climate, cyber, energy and trade.

At the global level, Brexit is likely to see Britain, one of the key actors in decision-making become increasingly distracted with its internal divisions. This provides an opportunity for India to contribute to the liberal democratic order's leadership.

India's NSG bid in Seoul should be seen primarily as an effort to bridge the gap between the existing nuclear disorder and the changing world order. New Delhi believes it cannot play a greater role in the emerging world order without a change in the nuclear order. Beijing's fervent and vocal anti-India stance in Seoul is only the latest in a series of efforts to keep India out of the various global decision-making processes.

This article was originally published by IndiaToday on June 30 2016

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Jun 30, 2016
WPS Sidhu
South Asia
South Asia