Security Council Working Methods and UN Peace Operations: The Case of Chad and the Central African Republic

This week, the UN General Assembly is debating a resolution proposing improvements to the Security Council's working methods, including the use of the veto. One important theme of the proposed resolution is the need to improve the ways in which the Security Council mandates, discusses and monitors peace operations. To coincide with this debate, the Center on International Cooperation is publishing a new paper by Alexandra Novosseloff and Richard Gowan entitled Security Council Working Methods and UN Peace Operations: The Case of Chad and the Central African Republic.

This paper - which follows an earlier report on the Council, working methods and peacekeeping in Ethiopia and Eritrea by Teresa Whitfield - looks in detail at the Council's oversight of UN and EU peace operations in Chad and the Central African Republic. The Council's work was often complicated by objections from the Chadian government to the UN's presence on its territory. The Council also struggled to link the UN's role in Chad and CAR with its larger response to the crisis in Darfur, which was part of the same network of conflicts. The paper concludes that alterations to the Council's working methods could have improved it management of the situation, although events on the ground and complex diplomacy away from the Council (especially in the EU) were also decisive.

Security Council Working Methods and UN Peace Operations: The Case of Chad and the Central African Republic

Security Council Working Methods and Peace Operations: The Case of UNMEE

Afterword comparing the lessons from the two reports by Richard Gowan

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Apr 02, 2012
Alexandra Novosseloff, Richard Gowan