Preliminary Findings of the Independent Review of the New Deal for Engagement in Fragile States

On 4 November 2015 CIC Associate Director and Senior Fellow Sarah Hearn presented the Preliminary Findings of the Independent Review of the New Deal for Engagement in Fragile States to the International Dialogue on Peacebuilding and Statebuilding in Paris

The New Deal for Engagement in Fragile States (New Deal) was developed by the International Dialogue on Peacebuilding and Statebuilding (IDPS), with the g7+ in the driving seat. It was launched in 2011 at the Busan Fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness. Its premise is that fragile countries were being left behind by supply-driven aid geared towards the MDGs. Donors cannot build peace and states from the outside, thus the New Deal is predicated on the primacy of national ownership. Countries must first resolve conflict and start the long process of building institutions and trust between the state and society. Five Peacebuilding and Statebuilding Goals (PSGs) offer a framework for prioritisation. FOCUS and TRUST outline partnership principles. Fragility assessments are used to diagnose the root causes of conflict. One vision-one plan frameworks define nationallyowned and led priorities to exit fragility. Compacts outline mutually agreed results and accountability criteria between partners. Partners commit to transparency, harmonization and building country systems. The paradigm was launched with great fanfare as a means to strengthen aid effectiveness and replace the “failed states” security and foreign policy of old.

Read the full Preliminary Findings of the Independent Review of the New Deal for Engagement in Fragile States

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Nov 04, 2015
Sarah Hearn